• RSS Ludwig Von Mises Institute of Austrian Economics

    • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.
  • RSS Republican Liberty Caucus

    • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.
  • RSS Freedom Watch

    • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.
  • RSS Free Talk Live

    • Free Talk Live 2017-09-18
      Pharma Bro :: Common Law :: Digital Cash :: Mark's Boat :: Kid Tazed in His Testicles to Death :: Mental Illness :: Google Bots :: Homelessness :: Cop Shootings :: HOSTS - Mark, Melanie
    • FTL Digest 2017-09-17
      Free Talk Live's Daily Digests feature highlights from our full-length seven-day-a-week live radio show, selected and edited by Riley Blake. Enjoying the digests? Please donate $5-10 per month to Riley via this link: https://www.patreon.com/crblake86 If you want to donate via bitcoin, you can do so at the following address: 1NytDNA14UcYsvzX5DHhzowGCqNou […]
    • Free Talk Live 2017-09-17
      Broadcasting From the Free State Bitcoin Shoppe's Grand Opening in Portsmouth, NH :: Operating the Store :: Is Bitcoin the Best? :: Bitcoin and Banks :: World Famous Bitcoin Tour :: Derrick J's Favorite Customer Stories :: Joel Valenzuela from Dash Force News Joins Us :: Cryptocurrency Acceptance in Other Countries :: Bitcoin Vending Machine :: Vic […]
  • RSS Break the Matrix

    • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.
  • RSS Schiff Radio

    • Fed Minutes More Show Than Substance – Ep. 285
      Market Anticipates Quantitative Tightening The market continues to rise; people are excited about the Fed meeting that start tomorrow and concludes on Wednesday.  Nobody expects a rate hike and there’s not going to be a rate hike, but what everybody is looking forward to is the Fed outlining its strategy for quantitative tightening. Shrinking the […] The pos […]
    • Tax Deal With Dems Won’t Stimulate Growth – Ep. 284
      President Trump Courts Dems on Tax Reform I think the catalyst for the rise in the stock market today is enthusiasm over President Trump’s announcement that he is working with the Democrats and is close to a deal on tax cuts. So that if he can’t get something done with the Republicans, he will get […] The post Tax Deal With Dems Won’t Stimulate Growth – Ep. […]
    • Risk On Includes U.S. Dollar – Ep. 283
      A Huge Risk-On Day The markets rallied all over the world.  Everything was up. All the foreign markets – European markets, Asian markets, rallied.  It was a huge risk-on day. Stocks went up and bonds got clobbered. Yields rose on government bonds, the 10-yr. out to the 30-yr. Insurance Rates Going Up There will be […] The post Risk On Includes U.S. Dollar – […]
    • Blowing the Roof Off the Debt Ceiling
      Trump said Government was Too Stupid When Donald Trump was originally elected President, I was out there warning, that budget deficits under the Trump Presidency are going to be huge.  Donald Trump never ran as a fiscal conservative or a Libertarian.  He didn’t say government was too big, he just said it was too stupid. […] The post Blowing the Roof Off the […]
    • Blowing Off The Roof
      The commentary below is from Peter Schiff, CEO of Euro Pacific Capital and author of the The Real Crash: America’s Coming Bankruptcy. Please feel free to excerpt what you like with proper attribution. To speak with Peter, please contact Andrew Schiff at 203-662-9700 ex. 135 or aschiff@europac.net. By: Peter Schiff, President and CEO Euro Pacific Capital Of [ […]

Public union reform and the victory of Governor Scott Walker

“A democracy will continue to exist up until the time that voters discover they can vote themselves generous gifts from the public treasury.” – Alexander Tytler

These apocryphal words were spoken by a Scottish historian back in the early 1800’s and ring ever so true today, especially with public unions.  However, this year the GOP has taken a stand to reform this symbiotic relationship between public unions and the politicians they “bargain” with by passing key reforms to curtail their collective bargaining powers.  Despite the Democrats fleeing the state for the past several weeks to shutdown the legislative process, today the Wisconsin Assembly voted 53-42 to pass a bill that would break the status quo and reform the public union policies.  Other states have followed Governor Walker’s lead, such as Ohio which is about to pass similar legislation, and California where Lanny Ebenstein plans to put up a ballot measure for the next election.

There are currently 22 Right To Work states in the nation, where employees have the freedom to decide for themselves whether or not to join or financially support a union (24 soon with Wisconsin and Ohio).  The Right to Work doctrine is based on the principle of association.  If an employee wants to work in the public sector, he or she should not be required to join a union and be forced to pay dues.  The employee should have the freedom to not associate with an organization he or she doesn’t want to associate with.  For far too long, public unions have held a monopoly over the labor force, and this has caused wages and benefits to increase dramatically, while the results of their service has declined at the same rate.  With a system that guarantees job security and maintains equal wages, incentives to excel or stand out are eliminated and this has caused a great disservice to many tax payers and children.  In Right to Work states, employees are still working in the public sector and studies have shown that their disposable income is just as high as those employees in non-Right to Work states.

Although you might find lots of pro-union articles in the media and see pictures of all the union protestors, just remember that it’s hard for the looters to face the reality of what they’re doing is wrong.  The following article (Government Unions 101: What Public-Sector Unions Won’t Tell You) from the Heritage Institute is a great fact sheet for all you need to know about public unions:

What Is Government Collective Bargaining?

  • Legal Monopoly: Government collective bargaining gives unions a monopoly on the government’s workforce. The government must employ workers on the terms the union negotiates. It may not hire competing workers.
  • Private vs. Public-Sector: Unions operate differently in government than in the private sector. Private-sector unions bargain over limited profits. Competition from other businesses moderates wage demands. Governments earn no profits and have no competition. Government unions negotiate for more tax dollars.
  • Risking Public Services: When government unions strike, they can deprive citizens of essential services—such as education for children—until demands are met.

History of Government Collective Bargaining

  • Unions Once Rejected: Early labor leaders didn’t believe unions belonged in government. In 1955, George Meany, then-president of the AFL-CIO, said: “It is impossible to bargain collectively with the government.” In 1959 the AFL-CIO Executive Council declared, “In terms of accepted collective bargaining procedures, government workers have no right beyond the authority to petition Congress—a right available to every citizen.”
  • FDR: President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (D) gave unions extensive powers to bargain collectively in the private sector but excluded them from government. FDR believed collective bargaining had no place in public service and that a government strike was “unthinkable and intolerable.”
  • A Change of Heart: Union membership peaked in the private sector in the 1950s. Unions came to see government employees as valuable new dues-paying members. Some states, like VA and NC, still do not negotiate public spending with government unions. 52% of union members in the U.S. now work for a government.

The proof is in the pudding

The Consequences of Government Collective Bargaining

  • Leverage over Government: Granting unions a monopoly over work done in government gives unions enormous leverage over budgets and taxes. Unions use this power to raise taxes and get more of the budget spent on them.
  • Inflated Government Pay: Government unions win above-market compensation for their members. The average government employee enjoys better health benefits, better pensions, better job security, and an earlier retirement than the average private-sector worker, although cash wages are typically not inflated at the state or local level.
  • Forced Union Dues: In the 28 non-right-to-work states, unions negotiate provisions that force government employees to pay union dues or get fired. This brings government unions billions of dollars.
  • Politicized Civil Service. Government unions have the power to elect the management they negotiate with, so they spend heavily to elect politicians who promise them concessions. Government unions were the top political spenders, outside the two major parties, in the 2010 election cycle.

What about Wisconsin?

  • In Wisconsin: Governor Scott Walker (R) is reforming collective bargaining. His proposal restores voter control over most spending decisions but does not completely eliminate collective bargaining.
  • Reforms: Walker’s proposal restricts government unions to negotiating over wages only, and not benefits or work rules (such as job guarantees for failing teachers). Voters would have to approve any wage increase beyond inflation. Unions would have to demonstrate that they have the support of a majority of members through an annual secret ballot. Wisconsin would stop subsidizing union fundraising by collecting union dues through its payroll system, and would no longer fire workers who choose not to pay union dues.
  • Is This Union Busting? A union is only “busted” if its members are forced to quit the union. Giving employees the choice to pay or not pay expensive dues is hardly union busting. Under Walker’s plan, Wisconsin unions would still have considerably more negotiating power than even federal employee unions.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: